asylum-art

asylum-art:

Amazing Illustrations by Artist Chiara Bautista

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Chiara Butista aka MILK is an enigmatic artist from Tucson, Arizona. Her work is insanely detailed and appears to be riddled with symbolism. Many of her subjects, which sport antlers or tentacles, are captured in chaotic, angst-ridden moments which are balanced perfectly by femininely decorated backgrounds and cartoonish animal friends. You could scour these images for hours and still find new details every time you revisit them. His work is rich with symbolism inspired cephalopods, falling planes, deer, piercing arrows, wounds,  teddy bears and drugs which may be as much a symbol for obsessive love.

boyonjourney

bourbonandpearls:

pinmeupagainstthesky:

These, for me, are the two most depressing paintings in western history. They were painted by post-impressionist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, a man who, due to inbreeding, was born with a genetic disorder that prevented his legs from growing after they were broken. After being so thoroughly mocked for is appearance, he became an alcoholic, which is what eventually caused his institutionalization and death. His only known romantic relations were with prostitutes.

And then he paints something like this which is so beautiful and tender and sentimental. It seems like the couple in bed really loves each other—cares about each other. Wakes up happy to look at each other. And I see that love and passion and I wonder how lonely he must have been. I wonder how he could paint something like this without it breaking his heart. 

Maybe they say artists should create what they know, not because its unbelievable when they extend themselves beyond their experiences, but because when they pull it off with such elegance, it’s so damn unbearable to look at. I hate thinking of Lautrec, wondering about the lovers he created and knowing it was beyond his experience. Creating something that he knows is beautiful and knows he’ll never really understand. 

fuckyeahexistentialism

Suicidal feelings are not the same as giving up on life. Suicidal feelings often express a powerful and overwhelming need for a different life. Suicidal feelings can mean, in a desperate and unyielding way, a demand for something new. Listen to someone who is suicidal and you often hear a need for change so important, so indispensable, that they would rather die than go on living without the change. And when the person feels powerless to make that change happen, they become suicidal.

Help comes when the person identifies the change they want and starts to believe it can actually happen. Whether it is overcoming an impossible family situation, making a career or study change, standing up to an oppressor, gaining relief from chronic physical pain, igniting creative inspiration, feeling less alone, or beginning to value their self-worth, at the root of suicidal feelings is often powerlessness to change your life – not giving up on life itself.